Archive for the ‘news’ Category

WELCOME BACK!

June 28th, 2011
By



Spc. Josh Vargaz, left, kisses fiancee Emilie Erbe during a return ceremony for US Army soldiers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division on Sunday, June 26, 2011 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa. The soldiers, the final chalk of about 3,700 total, returned from one-year deployment to Iraq. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

HELLO Y’ALL!

Well, it’s been a long slew of months since my last post, but I figured I’d grace you guys/gals with a “WELCOME BACK” assignment I had this past Sunday.  I had to cover the return of US Army soldiers to Schofield after a year’s deployment in Iraq.  I’d done these before and remember quite vividly that as soon as the soldiers are dismissed, it’s like disturbing an anthill as loved ones and their soldiers unite.  I had to be quick on my feet.  So reporter Dan Nakaso and I made acquaintances with a few of the wives and family members who were waiting.  One woman we met had just gotten married to her husband, then within a matter of weeks, he deployed.  In six months, she was only physically able to hear his voice just twice.  So you can clearly see the joy in her face when she leapt into his arms.

Kate Parker leaps into the arms of her husband, Lt. Matthew Parker during a return ceremony for US Army soldiers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division on Sunday, June 26, 2011 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa. The soldiers, the final chalk of about 3,700 total, returned from one-year deployment to Iraq. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

I always enjoy seeing true happiness between two people, and it always comes through in these welcome home ceremonies.  The whole time I was shooting, I had a big smile on my face.

Posted in news | 4 Comments »

Election Day

November 4th, 2010
By



Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie speaks at his campaign headquarters minutes after the first printout on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

I figured I’d give one full political-free day before blogging about my Election day coverage this past Tuesday.  But alas, things have started to settle, there’ll be no more signwavers on the streets, no more television commercials about what so and so did or did not do.  None of that.  Instead, let’s look at photographs!

My day started off doing the usual community coverage at the polling booths.  Since I did the Salt Lake/Kalihi area in September, I opted to go to McKinley High School.  I must say, those red, white, and blue curtains used for privacy at the booths can make for some great images if you wait for the right moment.

A woman who did not want to be identified emerges from a voting booth carrying her ballot at McKinley High School on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Moiliili. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

Four-year-old Grace Fujii waits patiently for her mother, Karen, to cast her ballot at McKinley High School on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Moiliili. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

I waited, and waited, and waited.   And…waited.  All this waiting for a good picture had me paying attention to people’s footwear, so I came away with this image:

SLIPPERS (i.e. flipflops)...in November?! Only in Hawaii!

After I felt I got what I needed at the polling place, I went to my car to prepare to move images but not before noticing the neat vent holes that adorn the McKinley cafeteria walls.  One more, for the artsy fartsy!

The voting booths as seen through one of the holed tiles in the wall of the cafeteria at McKinley High School on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Moiliili. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

After a quick stop at Starbucks to file and re-caffeinize(sic), I was off to Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie’s campaign headquarters for what I was expecting, would a be a long night.

I arrived shortly before the first printout, and was introduced by the Star-Advertiser’s Ken Kobayashi to Jim McCoy, one of the press liaisons, who gave me the lowdown that Mr. Abercrombie would probably make his appearance between the first and second printout.  First and second.  Not too bad.  One.  Two.  Problem is between first and second is a window of about 2-3 hours!  I phoned in a report to our news desk stating that I’m going shoot the reactions after the first printout, but depending on when Mr. Abercrombie shows up, I may or may not be able to move a photograph right away.

Positioning myself near the stage where an awesome Hawaiian music duo was playing, I surveyed the surroundings, looking for compositional elements, lighting, blocking, anything to plan out my movement once Abercrombie came out.  Of course, in my several election coverages I’ve done, no matter how much you thought out or plan, it’s ALWAYS out the window once the candidate is out.  But at least it passed the time.  Plus I was in position for the first printout, which, between my planning and plotting and enjoying the Hawaiian music, came sooner than expected.

Mila Kaahinui is overcome with joy after the first printout at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

James Kamakahi, right, points to the first printout as sister Marlene reacts at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

After the printout jube, I moved into position back towards the rear of the stage to await Abercrombie’s emergence.  Waiting.  And waiting.  And waiting.  This time, the waiting made me notice the breaks in the black stage curtains–compositional elements with which to shoot with!  The lead image at the top of the page was made because of these curtains, but more on that later.  That and a perfect hole to look through as I watched the doorway where Abercrombie was to appear like a hawk.  Finally he appeared, and the scrum began!  It felt like a “Resident Evil” movie, with all of the zombie photographers and iphone photographers enveloping myself and Associated Press photographer Eugene Tanner into a sea of flailing arms and cameras with all kinds of elaborate flash contraptions.

Neil Abercrombie is given a lei by UH President MRC Greenwood at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

In order to “clean up” my background of assorted heads, security, cameras and camera flashes, etc., I switched to second-curtain sync on my flash to blur the background and add tension to the shot.

Neil Abercrombie and his wife, Nancie Caraway, greet wellwishers at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie greets wellwishers at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

By now I had gotten what I needed from the Resident Evil scene, and decided to break away from the scrum–a challenge, I must say.  I looked at my watch, and what do ya know!  It was just in time for the second printout, and like clockwork, there it was on the projection screens.  So I made one more jube photograph before going back to my workstation to dump cards and move images.

Supporters react after the second printout at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

Because of the timing of the printout, combined with Abercrombie’s appearance, he made his way towards the stage to talk, and so this called off my initial plan of moving images.  The printout spoke volumes about what was to happen the rest of the evening, and I had to hold out.  So I made like a human cleaver knife and sliced my way towards the front of the stage as Abercrombie took front and center.

Abercrombie also invited to the stage Brian Schatz, and as soon as I got a shot of the two of them together, I had to start moving images.

Neil Abercrombie, left, and Brian Schatz raise their arms to supporters at the campaign headquarters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in Kakaako. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

Boom.  I was gone.  Had to start filing!

My work station was against a pillar next to the speaker stand.  Quite posh and comfy, I must say.  But the moment I was able to upload my cards, Abercrombie was out on stage again!! DARN IT!  And the Resident Evil gang had taken up residence (pun intended) at the front of the stage!  So I quickly put my laptop away, and tried to get to the side of the stage to try and cleave my way in like earlier.  Not gonna fly.  Abercrombie’s security detail seemed to enjoy saying no to me.  Okay.  So I went to the OTHER side of the stage, but not before sneaking in a shot from behind the stage.

So I made to the other side of the stage, finally, with no chance of being at the front.  Remember those stage curtains I mentioned earlier?  Well, they came in handy for my closing shot.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Abercrombie speaks at his campaign headquarters minutes after the first printout on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

The black curtains isolated him and made a nice, clean image.  Of course I had to take other images of Abercrombie as he made his speech, but this one proved to be my favorite.  By this time, my phone was ringing off the hook.  Deadline.  Time to make it.  And I did.  And my Tuesday was over.

Posted in news | 2 Comments »

Dino

July 23rd, 2010
By



Maili Beach residents Dino Palisbo and girlfriend Christie Kealoha do not know where their next move will take them. "I was born and raised on the beach, and we aren't homeless, we are HOUSEless" Palisbo says. Residents of Maili Beach Park as well as other beach parks along the Leeward coast of Oahu are alarmed and in a state of panic, leaving some with no where to relocate to. Honolulu Star-Bulletin photo by Jamm Aquino. Shot August 27, 2006.

This past Monday, I had to photograph the eviction of the residents who live along a stretch of coast in Maili known as “Guardrails.”  It’s always a sensitive subject for me to photograph the homeless because you have to earn their trust to be able to make an honest picture.  I learned this from meeting Dino Palisbo, pictured above, in 2006.  Palisbo was living past Guardrails on a stretch of Maili Beach then.  When I initially approached him, he was apprehensive, guarded, and stand-offish.  Anyone would be if you step into their home with a camera wanting to take their picture.  He told me to beat it.  As I walked away, defeated and dejected, I wondered what I was going to do, and who I was going to be able to photograph.  I was surprised to hear “Brah, you like talk” from behind me.  Dino led me back to his tent site.  He was testing me, he said later, because a lot of television news were so insensitive about the situation, just wanting to get their shots and quotes.  Palisbo went back for me because I respected his space and walked away when he said no.  That was a valuable lesson I learned from him that day.  There’s no going in motordrive ablazing.

I always take that lesson with me whenever I’m in a situation such as this past Monday.

As I made my way into Guardrails, the bulldozer had already begun making its rounds–the inevitable for many residents.  The smell of diesel fuel mixed with sea air was all too familiar and synonymous with the constant battle between the residents of the beach and the authorities.

Residents gesture at a bulldozer at Guardrails Beach on Monday, July 19, 2010 in Maili. State and City officials issued a warning to residents of Guardrails that they had to be out of the area by noon Monday, leaving the numerous residents with few options on where to go yet again. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

A bulldozer symbolizes the eviction of residents at Guardrails Beach on Monday, July 19, 2010 in Maili. State and City officials issued a warning to residents of Guardrails that they had to be out of the area by noon Monday, leaving the numerous residents with few options on where to go yet again. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

I ran into some residents who I talked to for a while and did not want to be photographed nor identified.  I asked if I could use their tent–their home–in a photograph that I thought was a telling image of the situation.  I waited for the bulldozer to pass by and framed it with the tent in the foreground.  I shook hands in appreciation with the woman who allowed me to photograph her tent and set off down the beach.  Coming around a corner of dilapidated drywall and makeshift chainlink fence, I see a longhaired man, from behind, lifting his belongings. I approach him and was about to speak when he turned around and looked at me.

It was Dino.

I stopped dead in my tracks and let out an audible gasp.

“Dino,” I quipped.

“Yeah?” he asked.

“You remember me?” I asked.  I removed my sunglasses.  We made eye contact.

Almost four years.  1,425 days to be exact.

Dino dropped what was in his hands.  A smile had formed on his face, and almost instantaneously, I was embracing the man who taught me such a valuable lesson as a photojournalist years ago.

“Brah, HOW YOU!?” he asked, still smiling despite the gravity of the situation–he was getting evicted too.  I told him that I wish we’d seen each other under different circumstances, and he laughed.  He took me around his home, which was already almost completely packed up and ready to move because of the eviction.

Dino Palisbo packs up his belongings.

Palisbo helps a neighbor with her things.

Palisbo is photographed seen through the links on his front "porch" fence.

Palisbo said in 2006 and again this past Monday that as long as he had his throw net, spear, fishing poles, and bike, he'd get through anything. Here, he takes his poles and bike.

Dino’s cousin, Bob, lived next door.  He was breaking down his belongings as well.

Guardrails resident Bob (no last name given) breaks down his tent at Guardrails Beach on Monday, July 19, 2010 in Maili. State and City officials issued a warning to residents of Guardrails that they had to be out of the area by noon Monday, leaving the numerous residents with few options on where to go yet again. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

After a few more frames, I put my cameras down and helped the two men load their belongings into their trucks. When we were done, the bulldozer was no where to be found.  City and State workers were also no where to be found.  The police had gone.  But in protest, a man burned his tent.

****NOTE: Resident mentioned in caption is NOT the one in this photograph**** A resident of Guardrails Beach who didn't want to be identified or approached burned his tent in protest on Monday, July 19, 2010 in Maili. State and City officials issued a warning to residents of Guardrails that they had to be out of the area by noon Monday, leaving the numerous residents with few options on where to go yet again. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

I stayed with Dino, Bob, and an anthropologist named David from Taiwan who’d come to know everyone in this Guardrails community, for another hour and a half, just chatting, helping with little things.  But it had come time to part ways, as the threat of rain was in the air.  I gave Dino my contact info, telling him thank you for allowing me to tell his story with my camera.  He laughed and said when he was back on his feet again, he’d teach me to “holoholo” for tako, something I’d love to photograph him doing someday.  With a warm handshake and a smile, he packed himself in the back of his friend’s truck and was off.  I also wished Bob a farewell.  I walked towards my car, happy to see this man, but heavyhearted for the ordeal he must go through yet again.  To know where you’ll sleep tonight–a roof over your head, warm clean covers, a bathroom–that’s an aspect that so many of us take for granted.  Yet as I chimped through my frames when I got into my car, I found a frame that really tells the story of Dino:

Dino Palisbo smiles amidst City workers and a bulldozer evicting him and fellow residents.

I’ll leave you with a few frames from 2006, my first meeting with Dino.

August 27, 2006--Maili Beach residents Dino Palisbo, left, and Cory Chevalier spent Sunday brainstorming their next move. "Today we're legal, tommorrow, we're illegal," Chevalier said. Palisbo, who was born and raised in Waianae, remarked that "we aren't homeless, we're HOUSEless." Residents of Maili Beach Park as well as other beach parks along the Leeward coast of Oahu are alarmed and in a state of panic, leaving some with no where to relocate to. Honolulu Star-Bulletin photo by Jamm Aquino.

August 27, 2006--Maili Beach residents Dino Palisbo, left, and Christie Kealoha play with puppies Bula, right, and Kolohe. "We're not homeless, we're HOUSEless," says boyfriend Dino Palisbo, left. Residents of Maili Beach Park as well as other beach parks along the Leeward coast of Oahu are alarmed and in a state of panic, leaving some with no where to relocate to. Honolulu Star-Bulletin photo by Jamm Aquino.

August 27, 2006-- Maili Beach residents Dino Palisbo, left, and Christie Kealoha play with puppies Bula, right, and Kolohe.

Posted in ethics, news | 1 Comment »

Close

July 5th, 2010
By



A large brushfire threatens homes on Kamehame Ridge on Sunday, July 4, 2010 in Hawaii Kai. The fire was probably due to fireworks. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

What an end to a Fourth of July.  Well for me, it wasn’t a holiday, but nonetheless, quite pulse-quickening.  After photographing the fireworks at Maunalua Bay, I was off-duty to spend a late dinner with family up on Kamehame Ridge.  As I was helping with dishes, I couldn’t help but notice the smell…not of dishwashing liquid, not of the coffee on the brew, but…..FIRE!  I peeked outside the window and literally gasped out loud.  An ethereal orange glow was RIGHT THERE!  And I know that orange glow all too well, being a photojournalist for the newspaper.  Instinct immediately kicked in as I raced outside to my car to grab my cameras.  After a short hike, I was able to get the shot you see above as well as the following:

Sure enough, within a minute and a half of making these frames, sirens came wailing up the hill, and the cavalry had arrived.   Police were telling all residents to evacuate the area.  It was quite daunting for me, because while I made these images, I was also worried about my family and their home.  I immediately called our news desk to inform them that I had these images, but evidently the print deadline was far gone.  Still, I moved four images which made the Staradvertiser.com site shortly after midnight.

The next day, my first item on the agenda was to follow up the incident.  I had spoken with my family and they had just gotten home shortly before 8am and said that there were still smoldering hotspots along the top of the ridge.

When I arrived, a number of curious onlookers had arrived to survey the scene.  Honolulu Fire Department’s Air 2 helicopter was in the heat (no pun intended) of the action, flying sorties to and from the ocean to douse these hotspots.  I hiked to a point on the ridge to capture a rare perspective of a helicopter–from above.

Honolulu Fire Department's Air 2 works to extinguish hotspots from a fire on Kamehame Ridge on Monday, July 5, 2010 in Hawaii Kai. The fire started late Sunday night and was believed to have been fireworks-related, according to Capt. Terry Seelig of HFD. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

From my vantage point, I was also able to see a few firefighters working the hoses as well.

Firefighters work to extinguish hotspots from a fire on Kamehame Ridge on Monday, July 5, 2010 in Hawaii Kai. The fire started late Sunday night and was believed to have been fireworks-related, according to Capt. Terry Seelig of HFD. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser).

The ground was hot and charred, and my first thoughts were that I was glad no one’s lives or property were lost in this gargantuan blaze.  Honolulu firefighters really worked hard to make that happen, so please, the next time you see a firefighter, thank them for what they do and who they are.  I leave you with this rather painterly image of Air 2 as a passing shower acted like a show curtain behind it.

Posted in news | 3 Comments »

Reflecting on History…

June 6th, 2010
By



History.  That’s what happened last night.  Honolulu became a one-newspaper town as of 12:01AM June 6, 2010.  My assignment yesterday was to cover the final moments of the last printed edition of the Honolulu Advertiser, and it was one of the most difficult assignments I’ve had to do.  Difficult because of the loss of not just a piece of Hawaii’s storied history, but also the loss of many friends and colleagues whom I’ve shared a cutline, a laugh, a heated moment, and the passion of journalism in the field.  As with my previous “Lanterns” post, I tried to be reflective and respectful in these moments.

Honolulu Advertiser photojournalist Andrew Shimabuku photographs the new Star-Advertiser newsstand at the Honolulu Star-Bulletin newsroom on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

Honolulu Star-Bulletin City Editors Ed Lynch, right, and Betty Shimabukuro discuss a page for the final issue of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin at the Honolulu Star-Bulletin newsroom on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

After spending some time in the Star-Bulletin newsroom, I headed up the street with our reporter Allison Schaefers to talk to the Advertiser’s night crew putting out their final issue.  We walked in, and I was immediately overcome with a heinous feeling in the air–one of emptiness, of sadness, of letting go and leaving behind.  Workstations were empty.

Workstations were clear of all computers and personal belongings at the Honolulu Advertiser newsroom on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

About 20 people were in the newsroom putting together the final issue.  Among them was night city editor Andy Yamaguchi, whom I  met for the first time this night.  I shook his hand and he had a warm smile and mentioned that he’d seen my work through the years.  I was truly melancholy about having to meet him under these circumstances.

Honolulu Advertiser night city editor Andy Yamaguchi looks out at a very sparse newsroom at the Honolulu Advertiser on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

I then ran into an empty workstation with various memorabilia.

Various memorabilia sits on an empty workstation at the Honolulu Advertiser newsroom on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in downtown Honolulu. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

What saddened me most, believe it or not, was the water bottle with a post-it note saying “RIP.”  Details such as these I pay attention to, and though I didn’t know the owner of this water bottle, the drinker of the bottle could’ve been using it habitually all these days, weeks, even years.  I didn’t know, but I could relate.  History.

I had to file these photographs and make it out to Kapolei for the final run of the Honolulu Advertiser.  I got there and ran into Advertiser photographer Norm Shapiro.  We were both there to photograph the paper as it was coming off the press.  History.

The final run of the Honolulu Advertiser runs through the presses at the Honolulu Advertiser printing press on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in Kapolei. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

I’ve never been near a press before, and I’ve been in the newspaper industry for over five years.  It was overwhelming.  It hulked four stories high.  We waited until the 10 o’clock hour then the rollers started going, and the first run of the last Honolulu Advertiser came through like a subway train.

Honolulu Advertiser photographer Norm Shapiro photographs pressman Roscoe Nishida as Nishida checks a newspaper during the final run of the Honolulu Advertiser at the Honolulu Advertiser printing press on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in Kapolei. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

Pressman Roscoe Nishida quality checks a newspaper during the final run of the Honolulu Advertiser at the Honolulu Advertiser printing press on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in Kapolei. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

I was quite reflective upon this historic moment, and was unsure how I felt.  I just took it as my job dictates me to do–record it.  Freeze it in time to be remembered timelessly.

Pressman Herb Hara quality-checks a newspaper during the final run of the Honolulu Advertiser at the Honolulu Advertiser printing press on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in Kapolei. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

The final run of the Honolulu Advertiser runs through the presses at the Honolulu Advertiser printing press on Saturday, June 5, 2010 in Kapolei. The Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser will both be printing their last issues respectively on Sunday, June 6, as the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut on Monday, June 7, 2010. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

As you are all aware of, the new Honolulu Star-Advertiser will be making its debut into Honolulu homes, minds, habits, and lives tomorrow.  But this is not without saying that Hawaii has also had its lions’ share of top-notch journalists in the past century who were a part of both the Star-Bulletin and the Advertiser.  With that said, my heart goes out to those at the Honolulu Advertiser, but most especially in photo.

Competition or not, at the end of the day, I was proud to call each and every one of the talented photographers on the Advertiser colleagues and friends in this small journalism Ohana.  My warmest and best wishes to you, Honolulu Advertiser photographers of past and present whom I’ve had the privilege of sharing the field with:  Andrew Shimabuku, Eugene Tanner, Richard Ambo, Rebecca Breyer, Deb Booker, Joaquin Siopack, Norm Shapiro, Greg Yamamoto, Jeff Widener, David Yamada, and Kent Nishimura.  Each of you had vision, and that vision told Hawaii the stories it needed to be told.

Posted in news | 8 Comments »