Civil

February 25th, 2009
By

This past Sunday, I covered the Civil Union fiasco at the State Capitol.  A LOT of people, a LOT of red, so I figured I’d show you two of my faves from that assignment–one in color, and one in black and white.  Of course, for the newspaper, we always have to look for color, but as an individual visual journalist, I always like to look for both.  I liken it to the days when I was shooting film–one camera was loaded with color negative film, the other, Tri-X b/w.  It keeps assignments fresh when keeping this philosophy in mind.

COLOR:

 

I thought it was interesting that the portable toilets were also a noticeable RED like the hundreds of people who came out to support the rally against HB 444.

I thought it was interesting that the portable toilets were also a noticeable RED like the hundreds of people who came out to support the rally against HB 444.

B/W:

Protesters cast shadows on the pavement along Beretania Street during a rally, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009 at the State Capitol in protest of House Bill 444 against civil unions in Hawaii.  The grit of black and white on a high-contrast image like this adds to the impact.  With so many highlights and RED in many of my images from this assignment, I thought this was a fresh alternative. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

Protesters cast shadows on the pavement along Beretania Street during a rally, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009 at the State Capitol in protest of House Bill 444 against civil unions in Hawaii. The grit of black and white on a high-contrast image like this adds to the impact. With so many highlights and RED in many of my images from this assignment, I thought this was a fresh alternative. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Bulletin).

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10 Responses to “Civil”

  1. Putter Meinken:

    Your two photos above have artistic flair. Very nice. However, who decided to use an “art” photo to represent an overflow crowd at the Civil Union protest last Sunday? The “Protestor shadow” photo above implies that 20-30 people were at the protest. However, there were thousands of people there! The Advertiser published an accurate photo of the crowd overflowing the Capitol Rotunda. Star Bull gets an “F” for journalism!


  2. Hitter:

    Putter,
    I don’t think the shadow photo implies that there were 20-30 people there, be it in caption or visually. It has nothing to do with the protest except in subject matter. This is strictly for visual comparison on photographs. BUMP


  3. kent:

    visual story telling is about creating images that don’t necessarily tell the obvious.

    as photojournalists in this transforming industry, we are forced to constantly look at things from other angels.

    i humbly submit this idea;

    that there are two key factors that define the image: light and vision. visual journalists seek to place the viewer where he or she is unable to be. They do this to give readers the ability to view a perspective they haven’t seen before, enabling the photograph to transcend the mundane and mediocre.


  4. Lilith:

    I agree that it was a FIASCO!

    Equality now! thanks for the photos. Nice work.


  5. parv:

    In the black & white image I thought the shawdows were on the wall, until I looked at it again. :-}

    (Yeah, I missed the word “pavement” in the post for the background appeared to be a wall.)


  6. `aka`aka:

    I like both photos. What is the exif?


  7. Velvetacide:

    Most people would bother to read the article that the photo accompanies – and by reading, figure out that there were thousands protesting. These photos are great, showing us the power of solidarity, regardless of your stance on the topic at hand.


  8. Newbie:

    couldn’t tell what those were at first until i read the caption. ah yes, they are portable toilets… thanks

    the protester image reminds me of the National Geographic photo shot above the desert and capturing the camels’s shadow… original


  9. Jeff:

    The black and white photo is a wonderful image, with a perspective that tells a story of people connected on one side or another of the issue (symbolized by the shadow of the cord connecting them) and evidencing emotion in the figure with the raised hand. Well done!


  10. kiana:

    the photo of the sign wavers’ shadows on the street is different from all the other photos of the rally with the sea of red shirts. i love this photo! it’s telling of the heightened, emotional craziness at the time.


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