Wild Art Hunting

September 25th, 2008
By

Hey y’all!

Wild Art is something all newspaper photojournalists have to shoot on a regular basis.  It provides the readers a light-hearted, slice-of-life moment amidst all of the headlines and hard lines of news stories and photographs.  All the Star-Bulletin photographers have to come up with Wild Art-an assignment known as the Wild Art Hunt.  

It’s not always fruitful, and there certainly have been times when I was struggling to find a great moment or a great picture and the light is fading fast.

A lot of the successful wild arts I’ve shot have been dependent on patience and waiting for the moment, as opposed to looking for it.

Monday, I decided to go to Kakaako Waterfront Park for my wild art.  I noticed several parasailors as it was a nice calm day on the ocean.  Even though Hawaii doesn’t really have seasons, it felt like one of the last days of summer.

 

I used this bike rack to make a graphically appealing shot of this parasailor.  Using the environment to add compositional elements in photographs is something I'm always thinking about whenever I'm out shooting.

I used this bike rack to make a graphically appealing shot of this parasailor. Using the environment to add compositional elements in photographs is something I'm always thinking about whenever I'm out shooting.

After several shots of this parasailor, I noticed that there was an iron signpost a few yards down from this bike rack, with the sign missing.  Hmm.  I stood back and photographed the parasailors through this signage.

 

The parasailors through that iron sign.

The parasailors through that iron sign.

I then noticed several pedestrians and cyclists using the walkway and a lightbulb popped on above my head–framing THEM through this newly found piece of artistic dimension!

 

Here's a man passing through, and although visually and graphically appealing, I wanted something that was more of a moment--more human interest.

Here's a man passing through, and although visually and graphically appealing, I wanted something that was more of a moment--more human interest.

 

I also tried using elements OUTSIDE of the four walls of that sign to see how it would hold, compositionally, but ultimately dumped that idea.

I also tried using elements OUTSIDE of the four walls of that sign to see how it would hold, compositionally, but ultimately dumped that idea.

After waiting for a while, I saw a man and his young son carrying fishing poles headed my way.  With my luck, they walked straight down the path towards the water and inside the four walls of that iron signpost. 

 

Father and son head for the water to cast their lines.  Visually I thought it was okay, but I thought it would look better if their whole bodies were in the frame.

Father and son head for the water to cast their lines. Visually I thought it was okay, but I thought it would look better if their whole bodies were in the frame.

So I waited and hoped that they’d stand on the concrete wall for a better glance at the water…they did, and I was able to make a frame I was satisfied with.

 

I try to use environmental elements to make my images visually interesting.  When the right kind of moment lines up within these elements, you score!

I try to use environmental elements to make my images visually interesting. When the right kind of moment lines up within these elements, you score!

All images taken with a Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200 f2.8L IS at 200mm (to compress the view), Manual exposure, ISO 400, 1/400 sec @ f20, daylight whitebalance.

3 Responses to “Wild Art Hunting”

  1. kent:

    Nice telling story my friend. how long did you wait? i did a similar things yesterday. saw a puddle @ McCarthy Mall, sat and waited…

    did the same with a photo for an article about a walkway that hasnt been finished by the dorms. the original shot ,taken on a crappy camera phone mind you, was just of the construction area. i sat and waited till i saw some people jumping over the blocked off fence and running down the grassy knoll alongside the construction to give it the sense that they’re irritated taht the construction isnt done so instead of walking all the way arround, they just cut thru.

    thanks for sharing.

    cheers // kent


  2. mike:

    nice to see the thought process.. I’m glad the blog is still alive in well in the post Walker era.


  3. Lawton:

    Nice work Jamm my man. Couldn’t help but notice the analogy between your waiting for the perfect shot and these fishermen probably sitting and waiting for a nibble on their lines. Keep up the good work!


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